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Exhibit № 19. Anonymous, Dated 1675

Exhibit № 19. Anonymous, Dated 1675

A rare pair of Charles II forged steel carpenters/joiners dividers of large size, initialled WTS

£1,800


Height

23¼ inches (590 mm) long

Case

The shaped upper parts hinged and engraved on both sides with various scrolling motifs, an owl on a branch and a carpenter’s plane, a square, a chisel and an axe. Leading down the decorated square sections, one dated 1675, the other with initials WTS, probably for the maker or owner. The adjustment arc, with further scroll decoration and a wing nut clamp with trefoil handle. The legs with barley-twist central sections, leading down to the square section points.

Provenance

Christie’s South Kensington, 2005, lot 578, sold for £1729;
John C Taylor Collection, inventory no.7140

As an organisation, the Worshipful Company of Carpenters existed by 1271, but received its Royal Charter of incorporation in 1477. The Worshipful Company of Joiners and Ceilers was founded in 1375 and were known at various times as fusters, carvers, and joiners, they received a Royal Charter of incorporation in 1571. The craft of ‘ceiling’ refers to the application and installation of both ceiling and wall wood panelling.

While both are livery companies of the City of London, traditionally they differed from each other, in that carpenters utilised nails or pegs, while joiners used various forms of adhesives. This monumental pair of dividers is on a scale that could have been used for substantial carpentry work, such as building or roofing frames, but could equally have been utilised by a joiner or ceiler in large-scale panelling.

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Product Description

As an organisation, the Worshipful Company of Carpenters existed by 1271, but received its Royal Charter of incorporation in 1477. The Worshipful Company of Joiners and Ceilers was founded in 1375 and were known at various times as fusters, carvers, and joiners, they received a Royal Charter of incorporation in 1571. The craft of ‘ceiling’ refers to the application and installation of both ceiling and wall wood panelling.

While both are livery companies of the City of London, traditionally they differed from each other, in that carpenters utilised nails or pegs, while joiners used various forms of adhesives. This monumental pair of dividers is on a scale that could have been used for substantial carpentry work, such as building or roofing frames, but could equally have been utilised by a joiner or ceiler in large-scale panelling.

Additional information

Dimensions 5827373 cm