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Exhibit № 6. Edward East, London, Circa 1660

Exhibit № 6. Edward East, London, Circa 1660

A very fine and rare Charles II silver chaise clockwatch

£45,000


Height

67 mm Diameter

Case

The silver hinged case with split bezel and swivelling loose ring pendant, the case bowl pierced for sound, and engraved with leaves, scrolls and flowers, holding the bell inside and the back with holes for winding the two trains.

Dial

The silver champlevé dial centred by very fine and deeply engraved undulating flowers issuing from a vase, the integral chapter ring with Roman hours, half-hour markers and quarter division ring with blued steel counterpoised arrowhead hour hand.

Movement

The gilt-brass two train movement with plates held by four Egyptian split pillars, with fusee and gut line, the pierced cock with pinned asymmetric foot and engraved with foliage and flowers, two-arm steel balance, worm and wheel set-up with silver engraved dial and blued steel mounts. The silvered countwheel engraved with a Tudor rose, blued steel gate, striking barrel engraved with flowers and scrolls. The backplate signed Edwardus East.

Duration

30 hour

Provenance

Justice Warren Shepro Collection, USA, inventory no.1081, until sold;
Sotheby’s New York, 26th April 2001, lot 79, sold for $46,750;
John C Taylor Collection, inventory no.66

Literature

Garnier & Hollis, Innovation & Collaboration, 2018, (illus.) p.200

Escapement

Verge with pinned early gilt pierced and engraved floral cock

Strike Type

Countwheel hour strike

Exhibited

2018, London, Innovation & Collaboration, exhibit no.39

In England and Scotland, real tennis was a passion for the Tudor and Stuart royal courts. Cardinal Wolsey built a court at Hampton Palace in 1539, where Henry VIII was an enthusiastic player. Anne Boleyn was watching a game when she was ordered to present herself to the privy council, and then placed under arrest. In Scotland, James V built a court at Falkland Palace, which opened in 1541 and is the oldest surviving real tennis court in the world.
Charles II had also become an enthusiast while in exile in France, and after the Restoration he went as far as having clothes purpose-made, and his first accounts for 1660–2 list eight tennis suits. He is also known to have presented a silver watch made by his royal clockmaker, Edward East, as a tournament prize; while there is no evidence that this chaise clockwatch was that keepsake, it is notable that a watch of this type was regarded as a fitting and desirable royal trophy.

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Product Description

In England and Scotland, real tennis was a passion for the Tudor and Stuart royal courts. Cardinal Wolsey built a court at Hampton Palace in 1539, where Henry VIII was an enthusiastic player. Anne Boleyn was watching a game when she was ordered to present herself to the privy council, and then placed under arrest. In Scotland, James V built a court at Falkland Palace, which opened in 1541 and is the oldest surviving real tennis court in the world.
Charles II had also become an enthusiast while in exile in France, and after the Restoration he went as far as having clothes purpose-made, and his first accounts for 1660–2 list eight tennis suits. He is also known to have presented a silver watch made by his royal clockmaker, Edward East, as a tournament prize; while there is no evidence that this chaise clockwatch was that keepsake, it is notable that a watch of this type was regarded as a fitting and desirable royal trophy.

Additional information

Dimensions 5827373 cm