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The Glas Quare, No.188. Circa 1720.

The Glas Quare, No.188. Circa 1720.

A fine George I figured walnut month-going longcase clock by Daniel Quare & Stephen Horseman, London.

£55,000


Height

8 feet 2 inches.

Case

The case with deeply contrasted figured walnut veneers and a forward sliding break-arch hood, with restored dome caddy flanked by two brass ball finials. The original top frieze with pierced walnut sound frets to the front and matching frets to the arch below the cornice, the hood door flanked by brass-capped Doric columns. The trunk with concave throat mouldings above the rectangular trunk door, veneered in highly figured walnut and framed with cross grain mouldings. The cross-banded plinth has matching figured walnut veneers and is raised on a double skirting. The backboard stamped and inscribed O Glas Upsala 1852.

Dial

The 12 inch break-arch lacquered brass dial with silvered Roman and Arabic chapter ring, fleur-de-lys half-hour and lozenge half-quarter markers, and flanked by well-cast ‘Indian mask & scroll’ spandrels with asymmetric ‘dolphin & scroll’ spandrels flanking the large subsidiary date ring to the arch. The matted dial centre with a seconds ring and an oval reserve signed Dan: Quare & Ste: Horseman London 188. The finely pierced and sculpted blued steel hands are of typical Quare pattern with moulded centre bosses.

Movement

The substantial month-going movement plates are held together with five Quare pattern ring-turned knopped pillars. The underdial with a large 24 hour wheel to trip a date lever with a sprung ‘snotty’, in turn moving the subsidiary date hand in the arch. The going train has an anchor escapement with a lenticular bob pendulum. The strike train is governed by a rack and snail, striking the hours on the large bell mounted above; with two typical pulleys and brass cased weights.

Duration

One month

Provenance

Probably originally made by Quare & Horseman for export direct to Sweden;

By 1852, in the private collection of Dr. Olof Glas (1812-1880), Professor of Theoretical and Practical Medicine at the University of Uppsala, Sweden, and thence by family descent.

It has long been appreciated that Quare had an extensive export trade throughout Europe, as well as it being a matter of wonderment how Quare managed to attract such an assemblage of dignitaries and foreign ambassadors to the weddings of his children. Taking place in 1705, 1712 and 1715, the guests included not only English court figures rising in rank as high as the Prince and Princess of Wales, but also the Venetian, Florentine, Hanoverian, Portuguese, Swedish, Prussian and Danish ambassadors.

This is unrivalled for a clockmaker, but reflects his circle of customers, the envoys very conceivably acting as agents for transmitting orders from their home states for clocks, watches and barometers. Thus it made good commercial sense for Quare to ask such figures to his children’s wedding banquets, both in thanks and to encourage further orders. Quare’s goods have been discovered in many countries, including France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden, Holland, Lichtenstein and Denmark, as well as the former states now within unified Italy and Germany and further east in Europe in the countries formerly beyond the Iron Curtain.

Professor Dr Olof Glas (1812-1880)

Olof Glas was a Swedish physician and Professor of Practical Medicine at the university of Uppsala. He was born in Umeå, the son of Lars Glas and his wife, Magdalena, and the older brother of Lars Petter Glas, a shipowner and industrialist, who founded the massive steam sawmill in Sandvik.

Glas became a student at Uppsala University in 1831, where he read medical studies and became a disciple of Israel Hwasser, admiring his idealism but would later abandon his philosophy of nature. In 1837, Glas became a Doctor of Medicine and graduated with a master’s degree in surgery in 1838. He was appointed assistant Professor of theoretical and practical medicine at Uppsala University in 1839, as Professor of practical medicine in 1848 and professor of surgery and obstetrics in 1851. In 1856 he succeeded Hwasser as Professor in theoretical and practical medicine, where he remained until the end of 1877.

From 1852 to 1867, he was the curator of the university’s natural well at Sätra, one of the oldest health springs in Sweden, which was much improved under his leadership. In Uppsala he worked as a practicing physician, and was the prefect of the old hospital (1854-67) and the chief physician of the new Academic Hospital in Uppsala (1867-77).

Glas became a member of the Swedish Medical Society in 1842, the Swedish Society of Sciences, Uppsala in 1847, the Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1860, and the Science Society, Gothenburg, and the Physiographical Society, Lund, in 1878.

Olof Glas was married to Gustafva Charlotta Winblad von Walter and, in 1877, he founded The Olof Glas Scholarship, for students of medicine at Uppsala University. The scholarship fund continues to this day, providing for an accomplished, needy student for two to three years, who is Swedish-born and a member of the Uppsala Medical Society. Professor Dr Olof Glas died in 1880 and is buried at Uppsala old cemetery.

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Product Description

It has long been appreciated that Quare had an extensive export trade throughout Europe, as well as it being a matter of wonderment how Quare managed to attract such an assemblage of dignitaries and foreign ambassadors to the weddings of his children. Taking place in 1705, 1712 and 1715, the guests included not only English court figures rising in rank as high as the Prince and Princess of Wales, but also the Venetian, Florentine, Hanoverian, Portuguese, Swedish, Prussian and Danish ambassadors.

This is unrivalled for a clockmaker, but reflects his circle of customers, the envoys very conceivably acting as agents for transmitting orders from their home states for clocks, watches and barometers. Thus it made good commercial sense for Quare to ask such figures to his children’s wedding banquets, both in thanks and to encourage further orders. Quare’s goods have been discovered in many countries, including France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden, Holland, Lichtenstein and Denmark, as well as the former states now within unified Italy and Germany and further east in Europe in the countries formerly beyond the Iron Curtain.

Professor Dr Olof Glas (1812-1880)

Olof Glas was a Swedish physician and Professor of Practical Medicine at the university of Uppsala. He was born in Umeå, the son of Lars Glas and his wife, Magdalena, and the older brother of Lars Petter Glas, a shipowner and industrialist, who founded the massive steam sawmill in Sandvik.

Glas became a student at Uppsala University in 1831, where he read medical studies and became a disciple of Israel Hwasser, admiring his idealism but would later abandon his philosophy of nature. In 1837, Glas became a Doctor of Medicine and graduated with a master’s degree in surgery in 1838. He was appointed assistant Professor of theoretical and practical medicine at Uppsala University in 1839, as Professor of practical medicine in 1848 and professor of surgery and obstetrics in 1851. In 1856 he succeeded Hwasser as Professor in theoretical and practical medicine, where he remained until the end of 1877.

From 1852 to 1867, he was the curator of the university’s natural well at Sätra, one of the oldest health springs in Sweden, which was much improved under his leadership. In Uppsala he worked as a practicing physician, and was the prefect of the old hospital (1854-67) and the chief physician of the new Academic Hospital in Uppsala (1867-77).

Glas became a member of the Swedish Medical Society in 1842, the Swedish Society of Sciences, Uppsala in 1847, the Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1860, and the Science Society, Gothenburg, and the Physiographical Society, Lund, in 1878.

Olof Glas was married to Gustafva Charlotta Winblad von Walter and, in 1877, he founded The Olof Glas Scholarship, for students of medicine at Uppsala University. The scholarship fund continues to this day, providing for an accomplished, needy student for two to three years, who is Swedish-born and a member of the Uppsala Medical Society. Professor Dr Olof Glas died in 1880 and is buried at Uppsala old cemetery.

Additional information

Dimensions 5827373 cm